Is winter driving really that complicated?


As January came to a close, the heavens dumped snow onto the state of Kansas.

I’m not a huge fan of snow, and I hate ice. However, we got a taste of both thanks to this most recent winter storm.

Fine.

I can deal with it, I guess, but I didn’t realize there was something else in the precipitation. It was a type of pollution, and I fear many people were infected.

See, stupid seemed to have rained down upon Kansas just as the snow and ice settled in for a cold stay.

Generally, I wouldn’t be bothered by such stupidity because it invariably happens that whenever the weather conditions change, people become disorientated and confused about how to properly conduct normal, everyday tasks.

I have adjusted and learned to cope with the ineptitude of others.

However, in this storm the stupidity must have been at very high levels because I couldn’t drive through a parking lot without becoming enraged.

How hard is it to park a car?

Granted, if there is snow on the ground, the lines aren’t easily seen, but don’t most people have a feel for how close the parking stalls are to one another?

Every place I tried to park showed the same travesty.

Cars were parked next to each other, but there was enough space between each car that a person could almost get another vehicle crammed in there.

Why can’t people park normally when there is snow on the ground?

Everyone knows that the stalls are close together, so park that way even if there is snow covering the lines.

Most of the parking lots probably had their parking capacities reduced by an estimated 30 percent because people parked to far away from the car next to theirs.

Ridiculous.

Is society so lazy that we can’t park properly if we don’t have guiding lines painted on the parking surface?

I understand that ice and snow is tough and scary to drive in. Accidents often occur because the driving conditions are far below an ideal standard.

However, parking doesn’t involve that much movement.

All a person needs to do is creep through the lot at a low speed, find a location to park the vehicle and pull into said spot slowly. The car should be close enough to other vehicles to allow the driver to get out of the car relatively easy, but this distance should not an exorbitant amount.

Only take as much space as is absolutely necessary.

Don’t be greedy.

Of course, this frustration was compounded by the fact that at Wichita State University many students didn’t go to school because of the inclement weather, meaning there should have been plenty of spots open in the prime parking lots.

Sadly, though, the prime lots we filled to capacity because each car was taking up almost two parking slots.

This is Kansas, people.

Foul weather is going to happen, requiring people to adjust to the changes in their daily routines; however, that doesn’t mean common sense and intelligence should be thrown by the wayside.

Just park your car like normal and don’t let the big, bad snow flakes mess with you.

Remember, the snow will melt. You won’t. That’s dominance in my book, so don’t let the snow win.

Drive safely, and park smartly.

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One thought on “Is winter driving really that complicated?

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